The Essentials

 

“Backpacking: An extended form of hiking in which people carry double the amount of gear they need for half the distance they planned to go in twice the time it should take.”

– Unknown

Admittedly it’s not always easy to distinguish the essentials from the non-essentials. There is no secret formula. Basically it comes down to experience, individual preference and the dictates of the environment in which you are hiking.

Non-essential item for backpacking trips 

Just as each individual is different, similarly your packing list may vary according to the nature of the hike you are doing. For example, what you take on a weekend outing with friends (e.g. alcohol, comfier sleeping mat, fresh food, something to read) will most probably differ from what you pack on a multi-week excursion into the backcountry.

Irrespective of trip length or character, many of us (myself included) are guilty of taking gear that we neither need nor use. Going Lighter means putting more thought into your choices. The payoff is a simpler, less encumbered wilderness experience. Items to leave behind or downsize include:

  • Extra Bowl or cup:  Use your pot instead.
  • Towel:  Use a bandana or lightweight camping towel.
  • Guide Book:  Photocopy only the pages that are necessary for the hike you are doing.
  • Camp Shoes: Lightweight flipflops are ok, but extra shoes or heavy sport sandals are excessive.
  • Potty Trowel:  Use a tent peg, rock, sturdy stick or the back of your heel.
  • Utility Tool: Do you really need something with a corkscrew, fishhook, magnifying glass, etc.?? Nine times out of ten, all you require is a tool with knife, scissors and tweezers.
  • Novel:  Try and make it a short one. Nothing Russian, with the possible exception of One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. Probably not the best choice if you happen to be hiking in cold climates.
  • First Aid Kit:  How many types of bandages do you really need?
  • Perishables: For items such as fuel, sunscreen, insect repellent, toothpaste and antiseptic ointment, calculate how long you will be hiking for and then bring appropriately sized tubes/containers. It all adds up.
  • Clothing: Think practicality over fashion. Learn about the layering System. Adjust your clothing list according to the conditions in which you will be hiking. Always choose clothing that compliments, rather than duplicates other items in your kit. Avoid redundancies.
  • Avoid overcompensating: Before setting out on your hike, ask yourself what types of conditions you are likely to encounter. Next, figure out what you need to be safe and relatively comfortable whilst hiking in those conditions For example, if you are hiking in an arid environment in which the chances of heavy rain are practically zero, there is no need to bring along heavy duty waterproof clothing.
  • Make a packing list: Write up a packing list and review it after each and every hike. See what you did and didn’t use. Cull redundant or duplicate items. It can be quite a fun exercise to watch you list evolve over time. Experience will be your best teacher. You may have multiple lists according to the seasons and/or conditions in which you will be hiking.
  • An Open Mind: Learn from other hikers. Never be afraid to ask for advice.